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(An artist statement is constantly evolving and even changing.. This is a updated one for a book that features my work)


Drawing gives me the opportunity to truly see. As an artist, I do not casually observe my surroundings nor take them for granted, but rather view the world as a creator and architect of my own artistic vision. I have never been interested in simplification-on the contrary it’s the complexities and how we see them that drives me to spend countless hours on a drawing. This act of drawing enables me to gain insight and understanding of intricate structure, whether it is a human figure, face, an isolated eye or a tempest of trees. Drawing pushes me to examine every aspect of what I see – every pore and hair follicle, every leaf and branch. I become immersed in my observational skills and depict my vision in a way that a casual observer could not.

Once a drawing is complete, it is no longer related merely to the artist, but becomes a starting point for the viewer’s feelings and imagination. This alignment hopefully transcends the ordinary and the overlooked to something approaching the metaphysical and sublime. Photo-realism itself does not interest me in the least; realism does, details and textures do, ultimately seeing what others fail to see, until they see it in my work. When this is achieved, the collaborative relationship between the artist and viewer reaches its climax. Ultimately, and interestingly, the climax is a humble interpretation of the greatness of nature.

“A good “rendering” represents what a person sees, but “a work of art” illuminates what others do not.”

Armin Mersmann

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:iconkatshadow:
katshadow Featured By Owner May 17, 2011
Very well spoken. I feel there is nothing at all to be added to this.
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:iconsamuelpaulclair:
SamuelPaulClair Featured By Owner May 12, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
I've noticed something different about your artwork compared to others, at first I thought it looks like photos, but at a second glance I realized it's much more detailed than a photo could ever be. When I look at the work you've done, I like to stare at the portraits because I feel like I'm staring at them as if the person is right in front of me. It's almost like a I get a sense of intimacy with the subject in the drawing. This is what attracts me to your art work.
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:iconsamuelpaulclair:
SamuelPaulClair Featured By Owner May 12, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
I've noticed something different about your artwork compared to others, at first i thought it looks like photos, but at a second glance I realized it's much more detailed than a photo could ever be. When I look at the work you've done, I like to stare at the portraits because I fell like I'm staring at them as if the person is right in front of me. It's almost like a I get a sense of intimacy with the subject in the drawing. This is what attracts me to your art work.
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:iconidiotx:
idiotx Featured By Owner May 12, 2011   Traditional Artist
“A good “rendering” represents what a person sees, but “a work of art” illuminates what others do not.”

...exactly. Your efforts in work and word are an inspiration.
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:iconvasqi:
Vasqi Featured By Owner May 12, 2011  Professional Filmographer
As a fellow "realist" (for lack of a better word), I can appreciate the difficulty in verbalizing the motive behind work that is most often demonized.

I agree with your statement: "Drawing gives me the opportunity to truly see."

I find that working as a "realist" is an extremely personal experience. A lot of pleasure comes from simply figuring out how to get the medium to agree with the eye. It feels like solving a puzzle sometimes.

Galleries always seem to want some profound explanation for the work of an artist. As humans, we sometimes tend to want profound explanations for this life in which we find ourselves... my attitude is that every individual should be tasked to supply their own profound explanation for that with which they find themselves presented.

Sometimes I think people are too focused on meaning. I say "too focused" because meaning is so very personal and non-universal; it's the very antithesis of "the real".

No one will ever be able to see "the real" as long as they insist on clothing it in their imaginary meaning. Lao Tzu was trying to explain that in his book: Tao te Ching.

"Realism" is not my favorite type of art to enjoy, but it is my favorite type to execute. The execution of "realism" is philosophically developmental. An entertaining experience develops nothing. I love to watch movies, but I hope they never replace classical education with The Movie Chanel.

The galleries will never understand where value comes from in art. They will insist on fluffy art statements and the maximization of production. Actual value comes from skill and the rarity of the work. Sometimes you have to ask yourself: do I want to make a bunch of money for my efforts now, or am I more concerned with the longevity of the body of my work to be preserved for posterity and to steadily increase in value as the decades roll on an the woks out lives the artist?

Check this out: If you are actually concerned about the future of your work after you have passed on, then you really need to be familiar with how the industry actually works. I strongly advise you to read anything written by Clare McAndrew. Check out: "Fine Art and High Finance: Expert advice on the economics of ownership" (ISBN: 9781576603338)

In any event, keep up with the wonderful work.
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May 10, 2011
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